Low Carb Diets Are Hard to Stick to

I often see the claim that excluding entire food groups can be hard and that it is impossible to sustain such an “extreme” change in the way you eat.

This point kind of makes sense. Not allowing yourself certain types of foods could lead to feelings of deprivation.

But the thing is, all diets restrict something. They either restrict food groups or restrict calories. For some people, the calorie restriction approach may be more feasible. But it is NOT the only way.

Many people don’t seem to understand how low-carb diets work and what their main advantage is when it comes to weight loss.

This is the fact that eating low-carb leads to automatic reduction in appetite and effortless calorie restriction (1). Compare that to the low-fat, “balanced” diet – which requires you to count calories and be hungry!

This is a graph from one of the studies that compared low-carb and low-fat diets. The low-carb dieters are eating until fullness, while the low-fat dieters are calorie restricted (2).

I don’t know about you, but I hate being hungry. It is a very uncomfortable feeling.

If I get hungry, I eat!

If there is a diet plan out there that allows me to eat until fullness and still lose weight, then that sure is hell is the one I will choose. In most studies comparing low-carb and low-fat diets, more people in the low-carb groups make it to the end. If anything, they are easier to stick to.

Bottom Line: Low-carb diets are not harder to stick to. These diets reduce hunger and more people in the low-carb groups make it to the end of the studies.

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